Tag Archives: human ratsac

Gay History: 30 Years Later, a Look at the First AIDS Drug.

The FDA approved AZT in a record 20 months, a move that remains controversial today

All these years on, we are finally telling the truth about this insidiously poisonous drug, and the great marketing job by Big Pharma to sell it to a desperately ill population of people, and doctors who were also desperate, to provide some hope for their patients! The movie “Dallas Buyers Club” tells some of the story, of those who wanted something better than AZT to assist them in staying alive until something beneficial came along – which it eventually did! Things were not quite so bad here as far as pricing went, as with our Medicare system, the drugs were listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme as soon as they became available, and cost a mere couple of dollars per script to buy. But the big sell by Big Pharma also happened here, as did the results of several badly run trials. Like many, the biggest mistake I ever made back in those early days of drug treatments was to let my doctor eventually talk me into taking AZT – against my better judgement! And it’s not just me, but many others who will attest that all our immune system and declining health problems started at the same time we decided to take AZT. It’s not as if we were only on a couple of pills a day – we were on massive doses, and as I have already said, this drug was poison…”human Ratsac” was how it was described in a report from the “Concorde” trial…another unethically run trial, but one that didn’t sugar-coat the truth about AZT. Those who took the massive doses of AZT back in the late 80s/early 90s suffered from problems such as anaemia, peripheral neuropathy, and renal problems…and still do to this day!

HIV was first reported in 1981, but it wasn’t until six years later—in March 1987—that a drug to fight the virus was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). On the 30th anniversary of this milestone, Time magazine takes a look at the story behind the controversial med azidothymidine, commonly known as AZT.

Also known as Retrovir or zidovudine, the compound AZT was not originally created with HIV in mind but was developed in the 1960s to battle cancer. Decades later, scientists at pharmaceutical giant Burroughs Wellcome made a version of AZT to fight HIV.

To fast-track the med, the drugmaker conducted a trial with 300 people who had AIDS. After 16 weeks, it was halted because those taking AZT were doing so much better than those not on the med. The results were considered a breakthrough, and the FDA approved the drug on March 19, 1987, in a record 20 months, according to Time.

The approval was granted despite many questions remaining unanswered—for example, how long did the benefits last?—and despite other issues surrounding the trial itself. In fact, Time notes, the trail remains controversial today.

Then came a bigger controversy: the price tag. At about $8,000 a year ($17,000 in today’s dollars), AZT was unattainable to many.

Today, we have more than 41 drugs to treat HIV, many in combo form and with much fewer side effects.

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